Orthodontic Braces: What’s a Kid to Eat?

 

If your child has been fitted with orthodontic braces, our NYC orthodontist will give you complete instructions about brushing and flossing, as well as some recommendations about which foods to avoid. As a handy reference, I’m posting this in blog form so you don’t have to worry if you misplace the papers after you leave our Lower Manhattan pediatric dentist office!

 

Easy Foods to Eat When Braces Are New

At first, your child’s mouth will be a little sore, as the teeth are starting to shift just a bit and as a result of inserting the appliance. Stick to soft foods, avoiding tougher meats and super crunchy raw veggies. While icy foods, such as popsicles, can sooth sore teeth and gums, keep in mind that these sugar-laden treats also bathe the teeth in acid, which increases the risk of cavities, so be sure to have your child rinse his or her mouth afterwards. It’s fine to enjoy a burger, but we advise you to cut it up and have your child eat it with a fork for the first few days, to avoid aggravating an already sore mouth.

 

  1. Yogurt
  2. Fruits without pits, such as berries, oranges, grapes and bananas
  3. Thin crackers or cookies
  4. Cheeses
  5. Mashed potatoes and every child’s fave: macaroni and cheese or spaghetti
  6. Smoothies
  7. Soft meats such as chicken and fish, cut into small pieces

 

Foods to Avoid with Braces:

The point of food avoidance with braces is to protect the device from breakage. Breaking a band can result in an extra trip to our office, and it can inevitably happen when you already have a packed schedule!

  1. Popcorn: the hulls easily get jammed in the appliance and are tough to remove and biting into an unpopped kernel can break a wire. If you can find hull-less popcorn, that can work, but confirm with your orthodontist first.
  2. Chewing ice. Some kids have a habit of doing this, so ask yours if she does and if so, remind her to avoid this until her teeth are beautifully straight and braces are removed.
  3. Sticky foods like caramel, chewing gum, Gummy Bears, Tootsie Rolls, and the like
  4. Hard candies
  5. Hard foods like nuts and hard pretzels
  6. Foods that require you to bite into them, like apples, corn on the cob, etc. Your child can eat corn “off” the cob and apples when cut up
  7. Chewing on hard items like pencils, fingernails and pens must be avoided

The Bottom Line:

Braces are a wonderful invention for those of us whose teeth are crowded. The results can be life-changing and, when directions are followed, the treatment schedule can be kept!

How Much Protein Does Your Child Need?

How Much Protein Does Your Child Need?

 

We all know that adequate protein intake is essential, both for adults and for kids. I have every reason to believe that my NYC pediatric dental parents make sure their children get enough protein. However, here’s the question: do you know how much protein your children actually need on a daily basis?

 

The messages we get from the media and at the grocery store suggest that we all need more protein. Have you noticed this? Protein bars, protein smoothies, protein powder, protein-enriched ice cream and even bottled water with added protein. This “protein push” can easily make parents wonder if their kiddos are getting enough, but how much is enough? And is there a problem with too much protein?

 

Kids Need Protein

We all need a certain amount of protein to build and repair muscles, bones, and teeth and to provide energy for growing bodies. In fact, protein is needed by every tissue, organ and cell. It may surprise you to learn, then, that there are side effects of too much protein.

 

Protein is not stored in the body, so excess protein will not make your child stronger or bigger. Too much protein is, in fact, broken down and the excess is stored in the body as fat. Yes, you read that correctly. Fat.

 

An article from Harvard Health published in May of 2018 discusses the problems that can occur from eating too much protein. While the article is focused on adult protein consumption, it’s obvious that children can also eat more protein than is needed, resulting in an increase in body fat. They also note that eating too much protein can increase the risk for cancer, kidney stones, kidney disease, high cholesterol and cardiovascular disease. Less worrisome is the fact that too much protein can contribute to gut problems: both constipation and diarrhea, in some people, including children.

 

Why worry about these diseases, which are primarily affecting adults that eat too much protein? Because you, as parents, are teaching your child about nutrition with every meal. These habits will go with them into adulthood. So, how much protein is enough? Check out the graphic below from the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine. Your children need, roughly, about .45 grams of protein per pound of body weight. A palm-sized serving of fish, poultry or meat is about 3 oz or 20 grams of protein.

 

The Bottom Line:

Parents need not obsess about meeting their child’s daily protein needs so long as reasonable amounts of protein is served (and eaten!) daily. Choosing real food over supplemented protein products will educate your children about food choices, resulting in healthy habits that last a lifetime.

 

Want More Details? See These Articles

Are You Getting Too Much Protein? from the Mayo Clinic

Are There Risks Associated with Eating Too Much Protein?  (Healthline)

Can Protein Be Converted to Body Fat? (Livestrong)

Can Babies Get Cavities?

Can Babies Get Cavities?

It’s a myth that babies cannot get cavities in their teeth. If you have a tooth, it can get a cavity, says Lower Manhattan pediatric dentist Dr. Jacqueline Dikansky. Although it’s true that baby teeth will fall out when adult teeth are ready to emerge, this doesn’t mean that tooth decay is either a temporary or a small problem, as a cavity in a baby tooth, when left untreated, can result in an infection or abscess.

 

What Happens When a Baby Tooth Has a Cavity

Untreated cavities in baby teeth can lead to an infection or abscess in the tooth, causing pain and swelling. Even worse, the infection and/or abscess can result in tooth loss and damage to permanent teeth. Furthermore, if a baby tooth is removed or falls out due to advanced decay, the space left for future adult teeth is compromised, resulting in a crooked bite.

 

Children with Baby Tooth Cavities Have More Cavities in Their Adult Teeth

Studies show that children with cavities in baby teeth are 3 times more likely to have cavities in their adult teeth. This is likely due to dietary choices, improper or infrequent brushing, flossing and/or professional dental care. In other words: Habits. Habits such as picking up after oneself, washing our hands before eating, etc, are developed in childhood, as are dental hygiene habits. Children that grow up in homes where dental hygiene is given short shrift will become adults who ignore their teeth, as well.

 

The #1 Way to Reduce Cavities in Baby Teeth

The primary way to avoid cavities in baby teeth is this: never put your child to bed for the night or for a nap with a bottle, whether that bottle contains juice, formula or even breast milk. If baby needs a bottle, fill it with water only. The sugars in these other liquids literally bathe the teeth in carbohydrates which, when combined with bacteria in the mouth, lead to decay. You may have heard the phrase, “baby bottle tooth decay.” That’s what this habit creates.

 

More Ways to Reduce Cavities in Baby Teeth

  1. Never share utensils with your child. This includes sharing drinks.
  2. Don’t “clean” a pacifier in your mouth and then give it back to the baby.
  3. After giving formula or breastmilk, wipe baby’s gums with a warm, wet washcloth.
  4. Begin brushing baby’s teeth when the very first one appears.
  5. Avoid soft drinks, juice (even when watered down) and other high-sugar liquids, including milk, throughout the day. Serve milk at mealtime only. Focus on water as the liquid of choice.
  6. Limit the amount of sweet, sticky foods, which cling to teeth.
  7. Give your child lots of “tooth scrubbing” foods such as carrots, apples and celery.
  8. Floss and brush your child’s teeth twice a day.

 

Baby teeth are much more important than you may think. Preserving their health is imperative to insure proper speech, room for future permanent teeth, and costly treatment for pain and infections.

 

Contact our NYC pediatric dental office if you see signs of a cavity in your child. It may appear to be a black, white or dark brown spot that doesn’t go away after brushing and/or any swelling in the gums.

Eight Superfoods for Healthier Teeth

Remember the old saying: “You are what you eat”? A balanced diet is one part of creating and maintaining strong, healthy teeth and teaching your children habits that will last throughout their lives. You know that sugar promotes cavities and gum inflammation (gingivitis) by attacking tooth enamel, but what else? Are there actually Super Foods that should be part of your child’s diet to promote the highest possible quality of both dental and general health? According to WebMD and other sources, there are. Below are eight foods particularly beneficial for dental health. (PS: Some of them will surprise you!)

Almonds contain lots of vitamin E, which has been shown in studies to prevent inflammation. These little nuts are packed with calcium, manganese, magnesium and fiber, too. Because they’re quite hard, I recommend that you chop them up when serving them to your children, as in salads or as toppings on hot cereal or yogurt, or soak them overnight to soften them, which won’t eliminate their health benefits!

Is there a child who doesn’t like carrots? Loaded with nutrients such as beta carotene, fiber, vitamins A, C, K, and B8, pantothenic acid, folate, potassium, iron, copper, and manganese, these crunchy root veggies are also antibacterial scrubbies for teeth that help remove stains and stimulate saliva, which helps clean teeth.

The same kiddos that love carrots likely avoid leafy greens, either because they dislike the taste and texture of salad dressing and/or the strong flavor of greens like kale and spinach. It might surprise you to know that folic acid (aka folate), found in abundance in leafy greens, is a type of vitamin B believed to fight gum disease. Leafy greens are also rich in calcium! Not sure how to get your kids to eat leafy greens? Here’s a link to 10 Kid Friendly Spinach and Kale Recipes from MomToMomNutrition.com.

Did you know that red peppers contain almost 300% of your daily vitamin C requirement? Vitamin C protects the immune system, aids in the absorption of iron and protects the gums from oral bacteria. Red peppers are also loaded with folic acid, fiber and Vitamin A.

Interesting fact: Except for the Permagreen variety, all green peppers become red when allowed to fully ripen.

Most kids like animal protein, such as beef and chicken. Red meat in particular is loaded with iron and Vitamin B12, deficiencies of which can cause tongue inflammation and oral sores. You may wish to consider organic and/or grass-fed meat to avoid exposing your family to the hormones and antibiotics in mass produced meat.

Kids love cheese and its level of calcium, great for bone and dental development, make it a high quality food for them. Cheese also raises the pH in the mouth, which lowers the risk of tooth decay. Several European cultures understand the benefit of eating cheese at the end of a meal: it promotes saliva production which helps wash away food particles and bacteria!

Yogurt is an excellent source of both protein and calcium but kids aren’t in love with the plain variety, and yogurts with fruit are loaded with sugar. What to do? Add frozen, unsweetened fruit to plain Greek yogurt plus milk or almond milk to create smoothies. An alternative is to add jam or jelly made without extra sugar.

Certain varieties of fish, such as tuna and salmon, are considered “fatty fish.” The fat in these fish helps the body absorb calcium and provides vitamin D. If your kids aren’t fans of fish unless it’s breaded and deep fried, check out this page of Martha Stewart “Kid-Friendly Fish & Shellfish Recipes.”

In general, consuming more of the foods above, especially raw veggies, will protect the health of your children’s teeth and gums as well as the rest of their bodies! Appropriate diet plus twice-yearly visits to our NYC pediatric dental office will help your children maintain beautiful and healthy smiles!

Holiday Dental Emergencies

 

Dental emergencies are never convenient but during the holiday season they are especially difficult, because families are often away from home and their usual dentist when problems occur. This blog post will detail some of the common dental emergencies around the holidays and a preventative approach you can apply to your children’s teeth.

 

Problem: An increase in dental plaque.

This is common during the holidays, as your kiddos are likely eating more sweets, and a difference in your usual daily schedule can lead to forgetfulness about twice daily brushing and flossing.

 

Solution: Do your best to limit the consumption of high sugar foods and have your children drink water after eating sweets to minimize the impact of those sugars. Set timers on your cell phone to remind you to brush & floss both you and your children’s teeth twice a day.

 

Problem: Dehydration leading to dry mouth increases the risk for dental decay.

High sodium intake from many traditional foods can also lead to dehydration and dry mouth, which increases the risk for dental decay.

 

Solution: Experts say that by the time we have a dry mouth, we’re already dehydrated, so offer fresh water to your kiddos on a regular basis, as they are unlikely to notice dry mouth as an adult would. Drinking small amounts of water and other sugar-free beverages every few hours will help to counteract dehydration caused by high-salt foods and exposure to cold weather and dry indoor heat.

 

Problem: Undiagnosed dental decay becomes painful while you’re away from home.

It’s not uncommon that, between your twice-yearly visits with our NYC pediatric dental office, your child(ren) develop a cavity or two that rapidly advances before we see your child at your next appointment. When you’re in town and your child experiences dental pain, it’s easy to call us and schedule an urgent visit. This becomes a challenge if you’re away from the City.

 

Solution: Before you leave town, check with friends and/or family members to see if they have a pediatric dentist and, if so, note that dentist’s contact info. Alternatively, check Yelp or other resource for a pediatric dentist with high approval ratings so that, at the very least, you know who to contact in case you need dental care for your child before you return to New York. You can also call our office to see if we know someone in the area of your visit that you can contact in case of an emergency.

 

Problem: Fractured Teeth are more common during the holidays because kids are likely to eat more hard candies and nuts.

 

Solution: The solution is the same as above: have a back-up dentist just in case.

 

The most effective way to prevent emergencies during the holidays is to keep a regular schedule with our NYC pediatric dental office. During your child’s exams, we monitor their dental health and can address any potential conditions early on, before they become emergencies.

 

Enjoy your December holidays!

Secondhand Smoke and Gum Disease in Children

 

 

Hopefully, you have either never been a smoker or you quit before or since you’ve had children. Notwithstanding your commitment to a smoke-free environment, your children may be exposed to secondhand smoke when visiting the homes of family or friends who smoke cigarettes, cigars or pipes. You know that smoking is detrimental to health, causing stains, bad breath and other problems but research has proven that even secondhand smoke can affect your child’s gums and teeth.

 

What Oral Health Challenges Can Occur from Secondhand Smoke?

 

Gum Disease

When plaque builds up under the gums, periodontal disease is the result and can lead to infection, bleeding, tenderness and even tooth loss. Children who are exposed to secondhand smoke have a higher rate of severe gum disease than children who are not exposed.

 

Bone Loss

The American Academy of Periodontology did a study in 2007 showing that exposure to just 30 days of secondhand smoke leads to higher oral bone loss in children than in children not exposed. Essentially, the chemicals in smoke cause the bone tissue in the mouth to deteriorate.

 

Tooth Decay

Studies show that children routinely exposed to secondhand smoke have a 27% higher risk of cavities than children that are not exposed to secondhand smoke at home.

 

Oral Cancer

Cigarettes, cigars and pipe tobacco contain carcinogens. Exposure to secondhand smoke has been proven to increase a person’s risk for oral cancer.

 

SIDS

Secondhand smoke exposure has been shown to increase the risk for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

 

Other Health Problems Associated with Secondhand Smoke

Obviously, secondhand smoke exposure is problematic for everyone, but especially for youngsters. Children exposed to secondhand smoke on a regular basis are sick more often than children in smoke-free environments; they experience more asthma, allergies, coughing and ear infections than do children who live in smoke-free homes.

How You Can Lower Your Child’s Risk

If your children live in a home with a smoker, encourage them to quit smoking. Ask that they smoke outdoors or, at the very least, in another room with adequate ventilation, although this is not a perfect solution. Use air cleaners in your home to diminish the toxins involved with secondhand smoke. Visit at the homes of your children’s friends to discover if they’re being exposed to secondhand smoke when they go for playdates or sleepovers. Yes, I know this is especially difficult as your children become adolescents and you have less knowledge about what happens in their friends’ homes but if it prevents illness in your child, it’s worth knowing about. If that is the case, invite those children to your smoke-free home to discourage your child’s exposure to secondhand smoke. This can be done casually, without blaming or chastising anyone’s family.

 

Your children deserve to grow up without exposure to secondhand smoke. It’s OK to be vigilant about this. If you need additional advice, let me know. I’m happy to guide you.

Most Sports-Related Dental Injuries Are Preventable and Treatable

Fall is upon us and, with it, fall sports. If your kiddos are involved in athletics, you may want to know how best to protect them from dental injuries. A mouth guard is obvious, but many children play casual sports with other kids and don’t wear one. Do you know how important mouth guards really are, even in pick-up sports activities?

 

First, did you know that over 5 million teeth are displaced from their socket due to trauma every year? This amounts to over $500 million in dental costs and $5-20,000 in dental costs for each incident over the child’s lifetime. That’s a great deal of money and a concurrent level of pain that could be prevented.

 

Football, hockey, martial arts, basketball and boxing are sports that carry the highest risk for dental injuries, but even noncontact sports carry a level of risk for facial injuries such as lacerations, tooth fracture or tooth loosening.

 

Mouth Guards Are Essential

Your child’s risk for injury to the face and/or teeth is 2 times higher without a mouth guard. That means that kids should wear a mouth guard even when they play pick-up sports at the park! IT’s common that kids find mouth guards uncomfortable but consider this: without a mouth guard the risk of injury goes up and the injury that could occur will be more expensive to address. Consider mouth guards like helmets—you wouldn’t let your child go biking without a helmet, right?

 

Tips

  1. Never let your child play sports—whether organized or casual—without a mouth guard. Even if they protest!
  2. Be sure the mouth guard is properly fitted.
  3. If you aren’t sure, ask us to check it out.
  4. Buy a custom-fitted mouth guard for the best protection. They are affordable and they will provide an extra level of protection.

 

We want our kids to be physically active. Protecting their mouth and teeth with a properly fitted mouth guard helps to ensure their continued happiness both while playing sports and over their lifetime!

What’s in Your Toothpaste?

 

 

Have you seen the credit card commercials with the line, “What’s in your wallet?” Everybody has, right? This made me think about ingredients in toothpastes that many of my patients’ families use. Some of these ingredients irritate the mouth; contribute to canker sores, and/or increase antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

 

Does Your Toothpaste Contain Triclosan or Sodium lauryl sulfate?

Triclosan copolymer is an antifungal and antibacterial agent. Sounds good, right? Kills fungus and bacteria! Unfortunately, exposure to triclosan has been shown to increase strains of antibiotic resistant bacteria. This means that if your child (or you, if you use toothpaste with that ingredient) develops strep or another bacterial illness, it may not respond to the antibiotics prescribed by the pediatrician. Nobody wants that, right? Worse yet, when regularly used in toothpastes, deodorants and other products, Triclosan accumulates in the body. It crosses the skin barrier and can appear in urine, plasma and even breast milk. It’s banned in soaps in the US but, oddly, not in toothpaste. It’s banned in all products in Europe.

 

Not sure if your toothpaste contains Triclosan?

You may have trouble identifying the inclusion of Triclosan through reading the toothpaste box. It is sometimes—but not always—listed under “Inactive Ingredients.” Click this link for a list of toothpastes currently without Triclosan. Add to it the Crest line of toothpastes, which are reported to be Triclosan-free.

 

, often abbreviated as SLS, is a detergent and emulsifier found in almost all shampoos, hair color products, body washes, foundation makeups, liquid hand soaps, laundry detergents, bath oils and yes—in toothpaste. It’s the chemical that creates the lather that we all expect from these types of products. Unfortunately, it has been proven to irritate oral cavities and to increase the risk for canker sores. Sodium lauryl sulfate can accumulate in the body, much like Triclosan. It is banned in the EU (scroll down to see it on this link)

 

Not sure if your toothpaste contains Sodium lauryl sulfate/SLS?

As with Triclosan, you may be unable to find Sodium lauryl sulfate listed on the toothpaste packaging. Again, as with Triclosan, it is sometimes—but not always—listed under “Inactive Ingredients” on the box. Latest posts on the web indicate that major toothpaste brands, such as Crest; Colgate; Aqua Fresh and Pepsodent contain SLS. Tom’s of Maine Toothpaste for Children; Rembrandt Gentle White (formerly called Canker Sore toothpaste); Kiss My Face; Jason’s; and Biotene Dry Mouth toothpastes do not currently contain SLS.

 

As consumers become increasingly aware of the ingredients in toothpaste, manufacturers may ultimately eliminate Triclosan and SLS to meet shopper demand. In the meantime, check the web for updates as more Triclosan-free and SLS-free toothpastes enter the market.

What’s in Your Toothpaste?

 

Have you seen the credit card commercials with the line, “What’s in your wallet?” Everybody has, right? This made me think about ingredients in toothpastes that many of my patients’ families use. Some of these ingredients irritate the mouth; contribute to canker sores, and/or increase antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

 

Does Your Toothpaste Contain Triclosan or Sodium lauryl sulfate?

Triclosan copolymer is an antifungal and antibacterial agent. Sounds good, right? Kills fungus and bacteria! Unfortunately, exposure to triclosan has been shown to increase strains of antibiotic resistant bacteria. This means that if your child (or you, if you use toothpaste with that ingredient) develops strep or another bacterial illness, it may not respond to the antibiotics prescribed by the pediatrician. Nobody wants that, right? Worse yet, when regularly used in toothpastes, deodorants and other products, Triclosan accumulates in the body. It crosses the skin barrier and can appear in urine, plasma and even breast milk. It’s banned in soaps in the US but, oddly, not in toothpaste. It’s banned in all products in Europe.

 

Not sure if your toothpaste contains Triclosan?

You may have trouble identifying the inclusion of Triclosan through reading the toothpaste box. It is sometimes—but not always—listed under “Inactive Ingredients.” Click this link for a list of toothpastes currently without Triclosan. Add to it the Crest line of toothpastes, which are reported to be Triclosan-free.

 

Sodium lauryl sulfate, often abbreviated as SLS, is a detergent and emulsifier found in almost all shampoos, hair color products, body washes, foundation makeups, liquid hand soaps, laundry detergents, bath oils and yes—in toothpaste. It’s the chemical that creates the lather that we all expect from these types of products. Unfortunately, it has been proven to irritate oral cavities and to increase the risk for canker sores. Sodium lauryl sulfate can accumulate in the body, much like Triclosan. It is banned in the EU (scroll down to see it on this link)

 

Not sure if your toothpaste contains Sodium lauryl sulfate/SLS?

As with Triclosan, you may be unable to find Sodium lauryl sulfate listed on the toothpaste packaging. Again, as with Triclosan, it is sometimes—but not always—listed under “Inactive Ingredients” on the box. Latest posts on the web indicate that major toothpaste brands, such as Crest; Colgate; Aqua Fresh and Pepsodent contain SLS. Tom’s of Maine Toothpaste for Children; Rembrandt Gentle White (formerly called Canker Sore toothpaste); Kiss My Face; Jason’s; and Biotene Dry Mouth toothpastes do not currently contain SLS.

 

As consumers become increasingly aware of the ingredients in toothpaste, manufacturers may ultimately eliminate Triclosan and SLS to meet shopper demand. In the meantime, check the web for updates as more Triclosan-free and SLS-free toothpastes enter the market.

 

 

How much Sugar is hiding in your food?

All of my NYC pediatric dental patients’ parents know that sugar can mix with oral bacteria and increase the risk for dental cavities. What they might now know is that there are hidden sugars in foods that we consider “healthy.” For example, did you know that sugar is an ingredient in over 80% of all packaged foods? And did you know that the American Heart Association recommends no more than 12-20 grams of sugar per day for children (depending on age and caloric needs)?

Listed below are 5 kid-friendly foods that you probably have in your cupboards. This may be an opportunity to carefully check labels the next time you’re at the store. (When looking at the numbers below, note that 4 grams of sugar = 1 teaspoon.)

1. Nut Butters
2. Oatmeal
3. Granola & Protein bars
4. Canned or Boxed Soup
5. Yogurt

Nut Butters: Kids love Nutella! Unfortunately, it’s about as healthy as putting Oreo cookies between two slices of bread. According to the label, one serving of Nutella has 20 grams of sugar—5 teaspoons; about the same as 5 Oreos and the maximum amount of sugar for an entire day for the average teenager.

Other nut butters, even those with added sugar, such as Jif and similar, have 3 times the protein per serving, and only 0 to 3 grams of sugar per serving, making them a healthier choice. Do be aware that adding jelly or jam brings in another 11 grams of sugar—nearly 3 teaspoons—to a sandwich.

Oatmeal has been touted as a healthy breakfast option for decades. And it is—if you avoid the prepackaged envelopes of flavored oatmeal. For example, 1 serving of Quaker Apples & Cinnamon contains 3 teaspoons of sugar; their Real Medleys Apple Walnut version packs almost 6 teaspoons of sugar. Compare those numbers with regular oatmeal, which contains about ¼ teaspoon of sugar. Add your own sugar, maple syrup or honey and save both on sugar and expense!

Granola & Protein Bars seem like a perfect snack or even a replacement for breakfast for kids who aren’t hungry in the morning, right? Unfortunately, they are usually sweetened with artificial sweetener or refined sugars like brown rice syrup, dried cane syrup and others. Example: A Clif Builder’s Protein Peanut Butter bar has the same amount of sugar as 2 Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups.

For many of us, canned soup was a staple of childhood, particularly on wintry days or when we were home with the sniffles. Be sure to read labels, however, because it might surprise you to learn how much sugar is in a bowl of prepared soup. A serving of Campbell’s Homestyle Tomato Soup has the equivalent of 4 teaspoons of sugar and even Progresso, touted as a “better” canned soup, contains nearly that much in their tomato soup.

Yogurt has been a go-to snack, breakfast and lunch-box treat for millions of kids for over 20 years. Depending on the brand you buy, it might also be filled with sugar. Your average Krispy Kreme donut contains 11 grams of sugar. Dannon’s Activia Strawberry Banana contains 18 grams, as does Yoplait’s Original Mountain Blueberry yogurt. Consider buying plain Greek yogurt (which contains around 7 grams of sugar) and adding your own fruit.

If you’d like to read more facts about hidden sugars, http://abovewhispers.com/2016/11/02/hidden-sugar-traps-2/

I hope this review arms my patients’ parents to find and avoid hidden sugars that can damage or even destroy their precious children’s teeth. If you have questions about any dental matter, contact our Lower Manhattan pediatric dental office at 212-267-0029.